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Mini PCI Express Real-Time Interface For CAN Bus Or CAN FD

Posted by Industry News on

Kvaser Mini PCI Express HS v2

Kvaser announced their Mini PCI Express HS v2, a single-channel and a dual-channel Mini PCI Express interface boards with low latency designed for real-time environments. The two single- and dual-channel interfaces communicate with the PC over the PCI Express system bus, allowing for real-time performance and 1 µs time-stamping. They support both Classical CAN and CAN FD and measure 30 mm x 51 mm.

The Mini PCI Express HS v2 version provides a real-time CAN Bus interface that adds one high-speed Classical CAN or CAN FD channel to any standard computer with mini PCI Express capability while the version Mini PCI Express 2xHS v2 adds two high speed CAN or CAN FD channels. PC communication is over the PCI Express system bus, making for low latency with a time stamp accuracy of 1 µs.

Kvaser's previous products, the Kvaser Mini PCI Express HS and Kvaser Mini PCI Express 2xHS, will remain available for sale, the primary difference being that these versions use a USB port for communication with the PC.

Key Features

  • Fully compliant to the PCIe bus specification 1.2, Type F2 form factor (Full-Mini with bottom-side keep outs).
  • High-speed CAN connection (compliant with ISO 11898-2), supporting a bit rate from 50 to 1000
  • kbit/s for Classical CAN and up to 8Mbit/s for CAN FD.
  • High transmission rate of up to 20000 messages/s.
  • Time stamp accuracy of 1 µs.
  • Galvanic isolation.
  • Suitable for industrial environments.
  • Low profile mini PCI Express-compliant 4-pin Molex connector provides CAN channel access.
  • Includes Molex to DSUB9 cable adapter.
  • Complies with EN 61000-6-2:2005, specifying EMC immunity for industrial environments.
  • Operates over the industrial temperature range of -40 to +85°C.
  • Kvaser’s free of charge CANLIB SDK can be used to develop software for the Mini PCI Express HS
  • board. Windows DLL library and examples included.
  • Supports Windows Vista or later.
  • Linux drivers and a dedicated SDK are available as a separate download.
  • Extended operating temperature range from -40 to 85 °C.

More Information...


Teensy 3.2 With CAN FD Breakout Board

Teensy 3.2 With CAN FD Breakout Board

This is a CAN-Bus FD breakout board with Microchip MCP2517FD and Teensy 3.2. It has on-board 5 VDC regulator and reverse voltage protection.

Features

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  • On board voltage regulator (Input voltage range 6 VDC to 14 VDC)
  • Reverse supply voltage protection
  • Microchip MCP2517FD
  • 120R terminator
  • Optional OLED 128x64 (I2C) display

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